Call for Proposals: Grants for Research Using 2004 SIPP Panel

The National Poverty Center (NPC) at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan seeks proposals for innovative research projects that go beyond extant knowledge of obtaining estimates from SIPP for sub-annual federal and state program participation and receipt amounts, using different recall periods and methods (including, if possible, Event History Calendar). The research should use data from the 2004 SIPP Panel. The NPC anticipates funding up to 5 proposals, up to a maximum of $17,500 per award.

Deadline:

December 24, 2007
Proposals must be received no later than noon on Monday, December 24, 2007.

Background

The U.S. Census Bureau is re-engineering the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) to accomplish several goals, including reducing program costs, improving accuracy, improving timeliness and accessibility, and improving research and policy relevance.

For the past two decades, the SIPP has been the leading source of data on the economic well-being of Americans. A major use of the SIPP has been to evaluate the use of and eligibility for government programs and to analyze the impacts of options for modifying them. The SIPP collects detailed information on cash and non-cash income (including participation in government transfer programs) three times a year, and detailed data on taxes, assets, and liabilities are collected annually.

The Census Bureau is committed to improving the SIPP, and one of the major goals of this grant program is to support research that will inform the Census Bureau in this effort. Therefore, research projects that will inform Census on data quality aspects of the SIPP, including ways to improve the survey, will be given priority.

The main objective of the SIPP has been to provide accurate and comprehensive information about the income and program participation of individuals and households. The survey's mission is to provide a nationally representative sample for evaluating: 1) annual and sub-annual income dynamics, 2) movements into and out of government transfer programs, 3) family and social context of individuals and households, and 4) interactions among these items.

We seek proposals for innovative research projects that go beyond extant knowledge of obtaining estimates from SIPP for sub-annual federal and state program participation and receipt amounts, using different recall periods and methods (including, if possible, Event History Calendar). The research should use data from the 2004 SIPP Panel. Comparisons to these same estimates from other data sources as well as various effects of program participation on low income populations are also encouraged.

Listed below are some examples of topics, intended for illustrative purposes. This is not a comprehensive list of fundable topics. For example, researchers might propose to:

  • Elucidate the various mechanisms accounting for relationships between family structure/change and indicators of well-being broadly defined to include income, health or mental health;
  • Focus on the well-being of both adults and children in analyses of the impact of family structure and change; disentangle the effects of income on family structure/transitions;
  • Focus on men's or women's work lives, family transitions, and well-being;
  • Examine the transitions and/or spells in health insurance coverage and their relationship to other transitions.

Download Request for Applications

Applications should be sent to:

National Poverty Center
Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy
University of Michigan
5100 Weill Hall, 735 S. State St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-3091
ATTN: 2007 U-M Small Grants

Direct questions to:

Sarah Marsh
Program Manager, National Poverty Center
Phone: 734-615-3890