Why Are Black-Owned Businesses Less Successful than White-Owned Businesses? The Role of Families, Inheritances, and Business Human Capital.

October 2006

Robert W. Fairlie, University of California, Santa Cruz and Alicia M. Robb, University of California, Santa Cruz.

Download 'working_paper06-38.pdf'.


Abstract

Using confidential microdata from the Characteristics of Business Owners, we examine why African-American owned businesses lag substantially behind white-owned businesses in sales, profits, employment, and survival. Black business owners are much less likely than white owners to have had a self-employed family member owner prior to starting their business and are less likely to have worked in that family member's business. Using a nonlinear decomposition technique, we find that the lack of prior work experience in a family business among black business owners, perhaps by limiting their acquisition of general and specific business human capital, negatively affects black business outcomes.



Keywords:
Employment, Unemployment, and the Labor Market, Race and Ethnicity